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Is this a Dream or–is that really my LS7?

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CAC Does the Corvette Engine Building Experience - Page 5 of 10

by Hib Halverson
© September 2012
No use without permission, All Rights Reserved

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Click on the images for expanded views – it's much easier on the eyes. 

We moved the cart to the next assembly station. The rod/piston combos are installed with the most snazzy, tapered ring compressor I'd ever seen along with a plastic guide on the big end of the rod to keep it from scrapping across the crank journal. I put each piston in the fancy compressor, set that on the block deck and pushed the piston quickly and firmly into the block. The plastic guide insures the rod's big end and upper bearing shell meet the crank journal squarely. The rod bolts were run down with an electric driver, then, once all eight pistons were in, I used another spindle multiple to properly torque each pair of rod bolts simultaneously and effortlessly. Hey–I'm liking this power tool stuff.

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Image:  Mark Kelly/GM Powertrain

Next motor I do in my shop, I want one of these.
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Image:  Mark Kelly/GM Powertrain

Mike did the first two to sorta show me the ropes.
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Image:  Mark Kelly/GM Powertrain

First, you swab the piston skirts and ring lands with engine oil.
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Image:  Mark Kelly/GM Powertrain

Then, you put the piston into the ring compressor and add the plastic guide.
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Image:  Mark Kelly/GM Powertrain

Finally, you align the rod with the crank then holding the compressor on the head deck with one hand you push the piston top with the other. The plastic guide on the upper half of the big end guides the rod onto the crankshaft journal.
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Image:  Mark Kelly/GM Powertrain

This Spindle Multiple is just for rod bolts. As with all the power wrenches, if the fastener has been tightened properly, the operator sees a green indicator light and the wrench sends tightening data to the PBC's server.
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Image:  Mark Kelly/GM Powertrain

When a fastener is tightened, we give it a little fleck of orange paint. That way we Engine Builders can tell at a glance if a bolt has been missed. Seems redundant, I know, but it's actually quicker than looking at the computer display.
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Image:  Mark Kelly/GM Powertrain

The short block is nearly finished.
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