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  1. #46
    Member WhalePirot's Avatar
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    A heated O2 has a heating element to get the sensor up to operating temperature faster than it will with only exhaust gasses warming it. If the car did not come so equipped, an ignition triggered, 12vdc source must be wired to the 'extra' wire on the heated sensor, for the heating element.

    I believe that a wideband, which is a later sensor, used (so far) primarily on imports, is also heated, as a later device, but outputs a varying voltage to refine ECM adjustments. The 'old' sensors output three voltages for rich, lean and 14.7:1 stochiometric conditions.

    My use entailed the hope that it woulod last longer, with less carbon fouling. Now that I know more about them, it may not be a real issue or solution.

  2. #47
    Banned SSTibet's Avatar
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    Default Heated Oxygen Sensors

    I would guess with unheated O2 sensors one would not get the SES light on short rides even if there was a problem with the sensor itself or somewhere else effecting the lean / rich condition...

    The old fashion "thimble" type sensors work when the exhaust temperature reaches 650F degrees and therefore it takes some time for the O2 sensor to start doing its work. With a heated O2, the exhaust gas temperature is not waited for and the heating element inside the sensor provides the heat and makes the sensor to operate in a very short time after a cold start.

    That's what I gather from an article I read in Bosch's web page.


  3. #48
    SQLDBA
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhalePirot
    I believe that a wideband, which is a later sensor, used (so far) primarily on imports, is also heated, as a later device, but outputs a varying voltage to refine ECM adjustments. The 'old' sensors output three voltages for rich, lean and 14.7:1 stochiometric conditions.

    I came from the import market. My 1st car was a 93 LT1 T/A. I had Borla, no cat, LG motorsports G2 intake, hyper tech 160 chip, 160 thermostat, transgo shift kit, power pulley, and home made ram air going into the G2 intake. I wanted to get a shaker hood for it but never did. I ended up almost trading that in for a white 95 vette but after driving the car for a week and having a problem with the ASR, I used the down payment on my wifes wedding ring. The dealer said all they need is an extra $500 down or a co-signer and they could get the deal done. I had already used my down payment up so I told them I dont have a co-signer and got my T/A back with a free $100 detail job . When I got married I got a 95 turbo Eclipse and upped the boost and was spanking stock LT1 F-Bodies. I then got a 93 AWD turbo Talon. Put tons of money into it and it never ran right. One thing I got on my Talon was the LM-1 Wideband. It shows you an exact AFR without oscilating like a narrowband O2 sensor does when not WOT. I dont really know where the widebands started other than the Lamda O2's at the dyno. I know that the LM-1 from innovate first became popular on the turbo mustang forums. I dont really think that a wideband is need for a N/A car but if you have a Grand National or any type of forced induction then a wideband is a huge help, because you can tune to an exact AFR. I guess if you've ever had your car dyno tuned then you probably have had a wideband on it. The LM-1 uses the Bosch sensor.

    Anyway, I still say if you have a wideband and can lean out your car to 15.5 or so then you will pass emissions with no cat... well at least in Texas.

    Sorry so long.

  4. #49
    wishIhadavette
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    I'm surprised only one person mentioned turbulance with a gutted cat. insted of gutting the cat why not put a straight pipe through it so you won't get the turbulance. by the way I'm not going to even touch the legality or doing this.

  5. #50
    Member WhalePirot's Avatar
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    Ya know, a non-CAT car smells different from behind. I wonder when the SMOG cops will nail folks with the nasty EPA fine, based upon smell. Personally, I just feel much more comfy with a clean car, with great performance.

    I'd like to know more about how a wideband O2 works with a '90 ECM, given that it was designed for the 'old' one. The fuel tables might not support that extra data very well or the ECM may not fully understand it.

  6. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhalePirot
    Ya know, a non-CAT car smells different from behind. I wonder when the SMOG cops will nail folks with the nasty EPA fine, based upon smell. Personally, I just feel much more comfy with a clean car, with great performance.

    I'd like to know more about how a wideband O2 works with a '90 ECM, given that it was designed for the 'old' one. The fuel tables might not support that extra data very well or the ECM may not fully understand it.
    All a wideband sensor does is just give you the readings. The wideband I have is just basically a fancy gauge that gives the exact voltage of your exhaust AFR. I used the Super AFC to tune my fuel trims. I would think that to tune the fuel trims on a vette you'll need to get a stand alone AEM or something like that.

    The way the SAFC works is it takes the data from the MAF, before it goes to the ECU, and alters it to fool the ECU into thinking it has less or more air than what it acutally does.

    I noticed on the corvette forum that this guy also has an LM-1
    http://forums.corvetteforum.com/zerothread?id=815299

    Here is the LM-1 website:
    http://www.innovatemotorsports.com/lm1.php


    There are lots of other widebands out there too like the FJO, MoTeC, Tech Edge, Dynojet, ... I just wouldnt know what to tune the corvette's fuel trims with.

  7. #52
    Member WhalePirot's Avatar
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    I understand the wideband term to refer to the newer design O2 sensors, which vary the voltage signal sent to the ECM over a wider band (range) than the earlier versions, which only send one of three voltages. This improved design allows a much finer trimming of the fuel/air ratio.

    I suppose there are all sorts of readers which have wideband capability with much more ease than a DVOM affords. Perhaps the terms confused our chat.

    Gee, we have strayed from the header topic......again!

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