• Congratulations to Mr. Rick Hendrick for winning a phenominal piece of Corvette history tonight at Barrett-Jackson in Scottsdale, Arizona. Mr. Hendrick also went on to win Vin #0001 of the new 2014 C7 Corvette Stingray. Details and info about the '68 L-88 Owens/Corning #12 Corvette Racecar: (Copied from RM Auctions) Est. 685 bhp at 6,600 rpm, 427 CID L-88 big block Chevrolet racing engine, Muncie M-22 "Rockcrusher" transmission, front and rear independent suspension, coil springs to the front, and transverse leaf to the rear with Koni adjustable shock absorbers. Wheelbase: 98" • Generally considered the most victorious racing Corvette in history • Ex-Tony DeLorenzo and Jerry Thompson • Multiple SCCA championships; NCRS American Heritage Award • Fresh Kevin MacKay restoration • Extensive documentation America's Star-Spangled Sports Car For nearly four decades, the Chevrolet Corvette was the only sports car designed and built in North America. Capable of taking on and beating the world's best production sports and GT cars on the international circuit, Corvettes roared on the Mulsanne straight at Le Mans, flew on the high banks at Daytona, and blazed their lights around Sebring. On amateur SCCA circuits, Corvettes won fourteen "A Production" and fifteen "B Production" divisional titles in the 1962 to 1976 period. SCCA Nationals saw Corvettes capturing no less than 25 Run-Off Championships in A, B, and C Production in the same time frame. A Russian born ex-race driver and engineer hired by GM's Ed Cole gets the credit for the almost unbelievable transformation that took place from 1954 to 1957. The '53 Corvette was thoroughly underpowered, but the 1957 V-8 version won its class at Sebring, as well as the Sports Car Club of America "B" Production National Championship. In fact, in 1960, a Cunningham Corvette placed First in GT at Le Mans! "Corvette -- The Real McCoy" trumpeted the full page ads in the national media and that really said it best. The classic, solid axle Corvette gave way to the beautiful Sting Ray coupes and convertibles with independent suspension in 1963, and four-wheel disc brakes became standard in 1965. In 1968, it emerged as the dramatic Stingray (one word) with a "Coke bottle" shape, inspired by the '67 Mako Shark Show Car. Corvette Big Block Bruisers: "The Fast and the Few" Only a few Corvettes can legitimately claim membership in this exclusive club. John Greenwood's "Stars & Stripes" L-88 cars of the 1968--1973 period, backed by BFG and often racing on that company's new radial tires, certainly qualify for this short list. Dave Heinz's two Corvettes, liveried as "Rebel Flag" cars in a competitive response to the BFG effort and driven by Heinz and Bob Johnson, often beat the Greenwood team due to better race strategy and superior reliability. However, the very best racing results were scored by the two Tony DeLorenzo/Jerry Thompson Corvette team cars, which contested both the SCCA Divisional and National circuit, as well as all of the important U.S.A.-based FIA distance races. One of these, 002/68, their 1968 Owens/Corning Fiberglas L-88 car, is the very same that we are privileged to present here. Impressive period results include the 1969 and 1972 SCCA National "A" Production Championships, 1968 and 1970 SCCA National "A" Production Runner-Up, Second Place in GT at the 1969 12 Hours of Sebring, and the 1969 and 1970 GT Class wins in the 24 Hours of Daytona. In the 1970 event, it finished Sixth Overall, behind two Porsche 917s, a Ferrari 512, and two Ferrari 312s, but ahead of a Ferrari 250 LM in Seventh and a Ford GT40 in Eighth. This car, together with its team car, won 22 of 22 SCCA/FIA National Events during 1969--1971, with this car winning 11 of these! Observers will note that these two team cars changed numbers for each race entered, in order to give the perception of a large team effort. This car was always the highest numbered car and driven most often by Jerry Thompson.