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  • Cure time on paint for new 'Vette
  • Cure time on paint for new 'Vette
  • Cure time on paint for new 'Vette
  • Cure time on paint for new 'Vette

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  1. #1
    Jim
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    Default Cure time on paint for new 'Vette

    In the past, I've always been told never to polish or wax paint less than 90 days after application. Does this hold true for clear coat paint systems as well? Just how long should one wait before applying a polish or wax to a new 'Vette? Does anyone have any references covering this issue?

  2. #2
    jerrys96lt4
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    Jim . The clearcoat on your new vette will be as hard as it will ever get after 30 days. But all you will want to use is a pure wax no polish. That is unless there is a scratch or something that needs to be removed.

  3. #3
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    GS Diva's Avatar
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    Out of curiousity, Jerry, why do you say "just wax, not polish"?? I never use wax on my '88, just a polish.

    Lemon Peel aka Elaine


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  4. #4
    jerrys96lt4
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    Elaine,Polish has grit for cleaning -removing oxidation-scratch remover-and for acid rain removal. Pure wax does not. Most pure waxes are easier to apply than polish. Unless Jims baby is scratched it shouldnt need polishing for a good while
    .

  5. #5
    86targa
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    Ive been in body business for 30? years, now own my own shop. Pure Carnuba wax is very fine, any other waxes contain grit which will take small amounts of paint off. Try your wax on a non clearcoat car and see what comes off on your cloth. You cant tell on a clearcoat car because the clear will rub off white/clear. Polish also has some grit, but much much finer than waxes. My own personal cars, 86 Vette and 77 Ferrari, get polish only. Have never been waxed. Vette has 110,ooo and Ferrari has 95,000 and look like glass. My process for new paint after 30 days is rub out with rubbing compound, finer compound, swirl remover, then polish. I never use wax or recommend it unless your car is kept outdoors in the weather all the time.

  6. #6
    Member rwd's Avatar
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    One Chevrolet body shop manager I spoke to told me they allow 60 days.

  7. #7
    RubyDropTop
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    I must respectfully disagree with the last sentence in your statement. With the final statement that you made in regard to waxes, you are implying that wax is durable and is best suited for cars continuously exposed to the elements. It is widely known that wax lacks durability. The fracture point of an automotive wax is low - the oils also rise to the surface and evaporate. Waxes must be reapplied on a regular basis because of this. A far better choice for a car that is stored outdoors is a polymer sealant. A quality polymer sealant will last 4 to 6 months before reapplication is needed. A quality polymer sealant does not evaporate and has a higher fracture point....this would offer an outdoor car far better protection over a carnauba wax.


    Originally posted by 86targa
    Ive been in body business for 30? years, now own my own shop. Pure Carnuba wax is very fine, any other waxes contain grit which will take small amounts of paint off. Try your wax on a non clearcoat car and see what comes off on your cloth. You cant tell on a clearcoat car because the clear will rub off white/clear. Polish also has some grit, but much much finer than waxes. My own personal cars, 86 Vette and 77 Ferrari, get polish only. Have never been waxed. Vette has 110,ooo and Ferrari has 95,000 and look like glass. My process for new paint after 30 days is rub out with rubbing compound, finer compound, swirl remover, then polish. I never use wax or recommend it unless your car is kept outdoors in the weather all the time.

  8. #8
    Jim
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    My baby is under a carport. I recently underwent back surgery and will be enclosing this area as soon as I'm able to do some real work. Y'all seem very knowledgeable on this subject, so I've got a couple more questions while I have the chance. How do polymers work versus carnauba wax? Is there a chemical reaction between the polymer and the paint, or is there some fine grit in the polymer that provides some enhancement to the shine as there is in a wax? Is there a particular brand of polymer sealant that is better than others, and the same question for carnauba wax? I have some MeGuiar's Mirror Glaze Hi-Tech yellow wax #26. The fine print says, "Made with the highest grade Brazilian Number One Yellow Carnauba Wax. Contains polymers, resins and silicones for extraordinary durability." Would this be considered a good thing to have carnauba and polymers together in the same compound? Would it enhance the shine or would I need to apply a polish first?

    Thanks for everyone's input on this. I truly appreciate it!

  9. #9
    RubyDropTop
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    Jim -

    I will pass on to you some of my knowledge of polymers vs. carnauba waxes. It kind of sounds as though you are looking for what is best for your car and your current situation.

    First off, there is a significant difference between polymer/sealants and carnaubas. Polymers are synthetic/man-made and carnauba wax is found naturally (although you could never use it in it's natural form without processing it first). A polymer/sealant is in essence a plastic. It "works" by bonding to the paint finish with a series of molecular bonds. A quality polymer/sealant contains no wax or oils. Examples of quality polymer/sealants are Klasse Sealant Glaze and Zaino. These products contain no abrasives (or "fine grit" as you stated) at all, with multiple coats they serve to fill in imperfections, although proper paint prep is crucial to excellent results as with all detailing type products. A quality sealant should last between 4 to 6 months before requiring reapplication.

    In regard to carnauba waxes, there are several different qualities available depending on the look you are after, how much time you have to spend on the car and how deep your wallet is. Initially, you can split it down the middle by saying that there are "cleaner waxes" and "pure waxes". The cleaner waxes are a one step product gearded toward those that may have limited time or interest in detailing their car. Cleaner waxes both polish and wax at the same time - they do contain abrasives. In my experience they do not produce the same results as a separate polish and wax, but that is up to the individual. Many different manufacturers produce cleaner waxes that are readily available, such as Eagle One, Zymol, Meguiar's, etc.

    Then there are the "pure waxes", and you will find varying grades of quality within this grouping as well. Typically speaking, waxes lack durability. As I stated in my previous post, waxes require reapplication (depending on the wax and the conditions that the car sees) on a regular basis. Carnauba in it's natural form is extremely hard, and is therefore processed with oils in order to soften it for automotive use. Some carnauba waxes are yellow, others are white. The white waxes are more refined than the yellow, and often cost more as well. A "pure" carnauba wax contains absolutely no abrasives, it will only add depth and richness to your finish. I don't use any over-the-counter type waxes as I find them unacceptable in their performance, but the Meguiar's product that you mention (yellow #26) is one that is usually well spoken of. The #26 is what is called a "hybrid" as it contains both a polymer and carnauba. It is not inherently bad, just how Meguiar's chooses to manufacture that product.

    You ask about using a separate polish with the #26....the #26 does not contain an abrasive, so depending on what you are trying to address on your finish, you may need to use a polish first. I am not one for "combination" products (a polish/wax combination). I have always felt that superior results are achieved by using single purpose products. On my car I use a polymer (Klasse Sealant Glaze) follwed by a quality white carnauba wax (Pinnacle Souveran), but that is just my preference. One Grand Blitz wax is also an example of a quality carnauba wax (and it's alot easier on your wallet than the Pinnacle Souveran).

    I don't know what the condition of your paint is, so whether you require a polish first, is up to your discretion. Just keep in mind that proper paint prep will always play a significant role in the end result.

    I hope that this has been somewhat helpful to you.

    FORGOT TO MENTION: If you go the polymer route (either Klasse or Meguiar's sealant) there is nothing wrong with topping the sealant with a "pure" carnauba wax. Typically speaking, a sealant adds reflectivity while a wax adds depth and richness. So depending on the "look" that you prefer, you may want to use both. Build up your layers of sealant until you are pleased, and then add the wax. Just remember that a sealant will not bond to wax. There are mixed reviews about topping Zaino with a wax, and Sal Zaino does not recommend it.

  10. #10
    yankees1
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    Originally posted by GS Diva
    Out of curiousity, Jerry, why do you say "just wax, not polish"?? I never use wax on my '88, just a polish.

    Lemon Peel aka Elaine
    Zaino is a polish and it contains no grit! No better product then Zaino! Period!

  11. #11
    yankees1
    Guest

    Default

    Originally posted by 86targa
    Ive been in body business for 30? years, now own my own shop. Pure Carnuba wax is very fine, any other waxes contain grit which will take small amounts of paint off. Try your wax on a non clearcoat car and see what comes off on your cloth. You cant tell on a clearcoat car because the clear will rub off white/clear. Polish also has some grit, but much much finer than waxes. My own personal cars, 86 Vette and 77 Ferrari, get polish only. Have never been waxed. Vette has 110,ooo and Ferrari has 95,000 and look like glass. My process for new paint after 30 days is rub out with rubbing compound, finer compound, swirl remover, then polish. I never use wax or recommend it unless your car is kept outdoors in the weather all the time.
    GM states that a new corvette from the factory does not need any additional time for the paint to cure. The paint is fully cured from the factory!!

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