• 427 big block water pump pulleys
  • 427 big block water pump pulleys
  • 427 big block water pump pulleys
  • 427 big block water pump pulleys

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  1. #16
    Administrator Tom Bryant's Avatar
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    I checked the parts book and other sources and I can't find diameters of these pulleys. The 1966 427 used the 2 groove cast iron pulley.

    Tom
    NCRS 1360.............SACC 2082.............C1 Registry..............L81 Registry
    1959 Chevrolet Corvette 1981 Chevrolet Corvette , 350 L81 automatic Frost Beige

  2. #17
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    Default fan clutch

    Quote Originally Posted by LLC5 View Post
    Make sure your fan clutch is working properly, at idle with the engine hot and a/c on you need to feel a real strong push of air at your hand when positioned behind the radiator shroud. If your not sure what is enough air flow, find a vehicle with a electric radiator cooling fan and do the same test with that vehicle (vehicle static, a/c on). It should be a strong force of air.
    Thanks Tom. I don't have a fan clutch, its direct drive. However the air flow is weak. I am looking for ways to increase the air flow. Turning the fan faster is on of my thoughts. Thanks again for your time and advice.

  3. #18
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    Turning the fan faster may not make as much of a difference as you think, but it will make a lot of noise and the faster you turn it, the bigger the power loss and the higher the load on the V-belts.

    First of all the, a C2 BB was cooling challenged even when everything is right. Add aftermarket A/C and you're making a marginal cooling system worse. My guess is if you insist on a stock fan and a stock radiator, you're going to have to live with high coolant temperature at low speeds and when the car is stopped. Combine that with a hot day and you'd better get used to seeing the temp gauge up in the high 220s or low 230s in traffic and below 30-mph.

    You said it has a "racing water pump". Not sure what that is but I'd install a modern water pump, such as an Edelbrock. Use the stock accessory drive for that engine with a new clutch fan. Make sure the proper fan shroud is installed.

    Even better would be to scrap the engine driven fan assembly and shroud all together and go to an aftermarket electric fan system.

    Use a 180° thermostat. Keep in mind that putting in a 160° stat doesn't necessarily lower coolant temperature. All it does is open at a lower temp. The cooling system then rises to whatever temperature it can sustain which, in your case, is obviously not 160 or even 180.

    Install an aftermarket, all aluminum radiator from Griffin or DeWitts intended for use with A/C.

    Also, possible issues are engine running lean at idle or low rpm, spark timing retarded at idle and low rpm, both of which will make the engine run hot.

    Big Block even without air are very difficult to cool. With my 71 (modified 460-in BBC) it took a lot of cooling system mods to get the car to cool well, even at idle and low speed.

  4. #19
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    Default Pulley

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bryant View Post
    I checked the parts book and other sources and I can't find diameters of these pulleys. The 1966 427 used the 2 groove cast iron pulley.

    Tom
    Tom, thank you for your time, very much appreciated

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    Default BB turning fan faster

    Quote Originally Posted by Hib Halverson View Post
    Turning the fan faster may not make as much of a difference as you think, but it will make a lot of noise and the faster you turn it, the bigger the power loss and the higher the load on the V-belts.

    First of all the, a C2 BB was cooling challenged even when everything is right. Add aftermarket A/C and you're making a marginal cooling system worse. My guess is if you insist on a stock fan and a stock radiator, you're going to have to live with high coolant temperature at low speeds and when the car is stopped. Combine that with a hot day and you'd better get used to seeing the temp gauge up in the high 220s or low 230s in traffic and below 30-mph.

    You said it has a "racing water pump". Not sure what that is but I'd install a modern water pump, such as an Edelbrock. Use the stock accessory drive for that engine with a new clutch fan. Make sure the proper fan shroud is installed.

    Even better would be to scrap the engine driven fan assembly and shroud all together and go to an aftermarket electric fan system.

    Use a 180° thermostat. Keep in mind that putting in a 160° stat doesn't necessarily lower coolant temperature. All it does is open at a lower temp. The cooling system then rises to whatever temperature it can sustain which, in your case, is obviously not 160 or even 180.

    Install an aftermarket, all aluminum radiator from Griffin or DeWitts intended for use with A/C.

    Also, possible issues are engine running lean at idle or low rpm, spark timing retarded at idle and low rpm, both of which will make the engine run hot.

    Big Block even without air are very difficult to cool. With my 71 (modified 460-in BBC) it took a lot of cooling system mods to get the car to cool well, even at idle and low speed.
    Thanks HIb, I have been thinking along your lines as well. I did put in a Edelbrock 8850 water pump which is advertised as a high performance racing pump. Which I interpret as increased water flow, which as I find out may or may not help. So far not much help. I have been looking into aluminum direct replacement radiators which look stock. There is even have a "stock" aluminum radiator setup with electric fans as you suggested above. I think this set up will be my next step if this doesn't work out. The engine has been dyno'd at around 500bhp so loss of power is not too much of a concern, but I am a little concerned about the wear on the v belts and top and lower pulley bearings. Thanks for the validation however, at least my Plan B sounds like it is making sense. Yes I have been told by many people that BB's run hot and has been a well know problem that has been solved by going the restomod route. I may be chasing my tail since I know I am not the only one that has faced this problem and may have to make some compromises between originality and practicability. Thanks again for your time to respond to my inquiry.

  6. #21
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    Default Another question

    A big shout out to all that have responded, THANK YOU!

    I have decided to give a more robust fan a try. I will be testing that out tomorrow. I will not be using the smaller pulley; too many concerns. However the other two options are to get a stand alone new aluminum radiator or a radiator with built in fans. Does anyone have experience with DeWitts radiators: 1966-68 Big Block – DeWitts Direct Fit(R) Aluminum Radiators stand alone and combinations/with fans (the posted reviews are good)

    Also it was suggested to me to run pure distilled water. Apparently that is done in racing. Thoughts?

    Thanks

    Tom

  7. #22
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    DeWitts makes great radiators.

    You can use straight water for a coolant and it will cool better than a mix of antifreeze and water BUT there are a number of drawbacks to doing that. Provided you are understanding of them, you could consider that.

    First, you absolutely cannot run just straight water. You also must also use a coolant additive intended for use in systems running only water. Two of these additives which work well are: Driven Racing Oil "CST" and Red Line "Water Wetter." These additives contain the corrosion inhibiters, antifoaming agents and water pump lubricants necessary for cooling system durability. Also, both contain a wetting agent which reduces the possibility of localized boiling inside the cooling jackets around combustion chambers. If the engine has a problem with localized boiling, which some BBCs have, that further reduces temperature.

    Next, you cannot use straight water if the car is ever parked more than 8-hrs or stored where the ambient temperature goes below 32°F.

    You cannot use straight water if the car is operated at high load above 5000 ft. altitude.

    If you use straight water, you need to run at least a 12-psi system and preferably a 15-psi system.

    You must change coolant every two years regardless of mileage.

    Finally, know that straight water reduces the boil over temperature about 5°F below what you get with a 50/50° water/antifreeze mix. For example at sea level in a 15-psi system with a 50/50 mix you're going to boil at about 255°F. With straight water in a 15-psi system and you're going to boil over at about 250°F.

    In all my Vettes, I use straight water and either CST or RLWW or I use an 85/15 mix of water and Dexcool antifreeze along with CST or RLWW.

  8. #23
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    Default Water as a coolant

    Quote Originally Posted by Hib Halverson View Post
    DeWitts makes great radiators.

    You can use straight water for a coolant and it will cool better than a mix of antifreeze and water BUT there are a number of drawbacks to doing that. Provided you are understanding of them, you could consider that.

    First, you absolutely cannot run just straight water. You also must also use a coolant additive intended for use in systems running only water. Two of these additives which work well are: Driven Racing Oil "CST" and Red Line "Water Wetter." These additives contain the corrosion inhibiters, antifoaming agents and water pump lubricants necessary for cooling system durability. Also, both contain a wetting agent which reduces the possibility of localized boiling inside the cooling jackets around combustion chambers. If the engine has a problem with localized boiling, which some BBCs have, that further reduces temperature.

    Next, you cannot use straight water if the car is ever parked more than 8-hrs or stored where the ambient temperature goes below 32°F.

    You cannot use straight water if the car is operated at high load above 5000 ft. altitude.

    If you use straight water, you need to run at least a 12-psi system and preferably a 15-psi system.

    You must change coolant every two years regardless of mileage.

    Finally, know that straight water reduces the boil over temperature about 5°F below what you get with a 50/50° water/antifreeze mix. For example at sea level in a 15-psi system with a 50/50 mix you're going to boil at about 255°F. With straight water in a 15-psi system and you're going to boil over at about 250°F.

    In all my Vettes, I use straight water and either CST or RLWW or I use an 85/15 mix of water and Dexcool antifreeze along with CST or RLWW.
    Thanks Hib for the comprehensive reply. No wonder I have not heard of water as a coolant option. Seems very complicated for a questionable reward. I will take this off my options list. Thanks again.

  9. #24
    Member LLC5's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom66 View Post
    A big shout out to all that have responded, THANK YOU!

    I have decided to give a more robust fan a try. I will be testing that out tomorrow. I will not be using the smaller pulley; too many concerns. However the other two options are to get a stand alone new aluminum radiator or a radiator with built in fans. Does anyone have experience with DeWitts radiators: 1966-68 Big Block – DeWitts Direct Fit(R) Aluminum Radiators stand alone and combinations/with fans (the posted reviews are good)

    Also it was suggested to me to run pure distilled water. Apparently that is done in racing. Thoughts?

    Thanks

    Tom

    I would get a name brand aluminum radiator with dedicated electric fans and be done with it, you need a lot of airflow across the radiator and condenser and that is a sure way to do it.

    Racing requires a lot of work and constant maintenance, I would stick with coolant 50/50 mix with distilled water, or premix.
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    Thanks Tom66 thanked for this post

  10. #25
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    Default Aluminum Radiator

    Quote Originally Posted by LLC5 View Post
    I would get a name brand aluminum radiator with dedicated electric fans and be done with it, you need a lot of airflow across the radiator and condenser and that is a sure way to do it.

    Racing requires a lot of work and constant maintenance, I would stick with coolant 50/50 mix with distilled water, or premix.
    Thanks, I am coming to the same conclusion. While I want to keep the orginal look of the car, driving and good mechcanical solutions must take precedence.

    Thanks again.

  11. #26
    Member LLC5's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom66 View Post
    Thanks, I am coming to the same conclusion. While I want to keep the orginal look of the car, driving and good mechcanical solutions must take precedence.

    Thanks again.


    Yep, I hear you.

    Just keep all your OEM parts stored in a safe place.
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    Default OEM Parts

    Quote Originally Posted by LLC5 View Post
    Yep, I hear you.

    Just keep all your OEM parts stored in a safe place.
    Thanks, SOP. My garage is starting to look like a parts warehouse.

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