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Ken
01-07-03, 04:09 AM
I recently purchased a book entitled How To Understand, Service and Modify CORVETTE Fuel Injection & Electronic Engine Management by Charles O. Probst. It covers the model years 1982 through 2001 and the L83, L98, LT1, LT4, LS1, LS6 and the LT5 (ZR-1) engines.

I may include a review of this book sometime in the future in our REVIEWS (http://corvetteactioncenter.com/reviews/index.php) section, but I wanted to share these tips with you first. I should tell you that I didn't bother requesting permission to use them here, because they are all simple, common sense, rules we should all follow as we perform maintenance chores on our vehicles. That and the fact that I added some of my own suggestions. ;)

PLEASE READ THESE WARNINGS AND CAUTIONS BEFORE PROCEEDING WITH MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR WORK

Some repairs are beyond our capability. If you lack the skills, tools and equipment, or a suitable workplace for any procedure described in your manual, it is suggested you leave such repairs to an authorized Corvette dealer service department or other qualified shop.
Before starting a job, make sure you have all the necessary tools and parts on hand. Read all the instructions thoroughly, do not attempt shortcuts. (KS: I know that will be hard for some of you to do. :L ) Use tools appropriate to the work and use only replacement parts meeting Corvette specifications. Makeshift tools, parts and procedures will not make good repairs.
Be mindful of the environment and ecology. Do not pour any leftover automotive liquids onto the ground, down a drain, or into a stream, pond or lake. Dispose of in accordance with Federal, State and Local laws.
Never work under a lifted car unless it is solidly supported on stands designed for the purpose. Do not support a car on cinder blocks, hollow tires or other props that may crumble under continuous load. Never work under a car that is supported solely by a jack. The vehicle lifting jack supplied with the vehicle is intended for tire changes only. A heavy-duty floor jack should be used to lift vehicle before installing jack stands. Never work under the car while the engine is running.
If you are going to work under a car on the ground, make sure that the ground is level. Block the wheels to keep the car from rolling. Disconnect the battery negative (-) terminal (ground strap) to prevent others from starting the car while you are under it.
Never run an engine unless the work area is well-ventilated. Carbon monoxide kills.
Tie long hair behind your head. Do not wear a necktie, a scarf, loose clothing, or jewelry when you work near machine tools or running engines. If anything were to get caught in the machinery, severe injury could result.
Do not attempt to work on your car if you do not feel well. You increase the danger of injury to yourself and others if you are tired, upset or have taken medication or any other substance that may keep you from being fully alert.
KS: Hear that all you garage beer drinkers? :L
Illuminate your work area adequately but safely. Use a portable safety light for working inside or under the car. Make sure the bulb is enclosed by a wire cage. The hot filament of an accidently broken bulb can ignite spilled fuel or oil.
KS: There are many other choices in the marketplace now for the cooler flourescent tube type lights, but those still should be handled with care when using around fuel spills, etc.
Always observe good workshop practices. Wear goggles when you operate machine tools or work with battery acid, or when grinding. Gloves or other protective clothing should be worn whenever the job requires working with harmful substances. Read any manufacturer's instructions and warnings carefully. Avoid direct skin contact. And always keep sparks, matches and open flame away from the area.
Disconnect the battery negative (-) terminal (ground strap) whenever you work on the fuel system or the electrical system. Do not smoke or work near heaters or other fire hazards. Keep an approved fire extinguisher handy.
Do not re-use any fasteners that are worn or deformed in normal use. Many fasteners are designed to be used only once and become unreliable and may fail when used a second time. This includes, but is not limited to, nuts, bolts, washers, self-locking nuts or bolts, circlips and cotter pins. Always replace these fasteners with new parts.
Use pneumatic and electric tools only to loosen threaded parts and fasteners. Never use these tools to tighten fasteners, especially on light alloy parts. Always use a torque wrench to tighten fasteners to the tightening torque specification listed.
Friction materials (such as brake pads or shoes or clutch discs) contain asbestos fibers or other friction materials. Do not create dust by grinding, sanding, or by cleaning with compressed air. Avoid breathing dust. Breathing any friction material dust can lead to serious diseases and may result in death.
Connect and disconnect battery cables, jumper cables or a battery charger only with the ignition switched off, to prevent sparks. Always make sure ignition is off before disconnecting battery.
KS: There it is again! Remember this came up before when I posted about the C4 jumper block? Anybody care to explain, or elaborate?
The air conditioning system is filled with chemical refrigerant, which is hazardous. The A/C system should be serviced only by trained technicians using approved refrigerant recovery/recycling equipment, trained in related safety precautions, and familiar with regulations governng the discharging and disposal of automotive chemical refrigerants.
The ignition system produces high voltages that can be fatal. Avoid contact with exposed terminals and use extreme care when working on a car with an engine running or the ignition switched on.
Aerosol cleaners and solvents may contain hazardous or deadly vapors and are highly flammable. Use only in a well-ventilated area. Do not use on hot surfaces (engines, brakes, etc.).
Do not remove coolant reservoir or radiator cap with the engine hot. Danger of burns and engine damage.
Label battery cables before disconnecting. On some models, battery cables are not color-coded.
Disconnecting the battery may erase fault code(s) stored in control module memory. Using special diagnostic equipment, check for fault codes prior to disconnecting the battery cables.
If a normal or rapid charger is used to charge battery, the battery must be disconnected and removed from the vehicle in order to avoid damage to the paint or the interior.
Do not quick-charge the battery (for boost starting) for longer than one minute. Wait at least one minute before boosting the battery a second time.
Connect and disconnect a battery charger only with the battery charger switched off.
Sealed or "maintenance free" batteries should be slow-charged only, at an amperage rate that is approximately 10% of the battery's ampere-hour (Ah) rating.
Do not allow battery charging voltage to exceed 16.5 volts. If the battery begins producing gas or boiling violently, reduce the charging rate. Boosting a sulfated battery at a high charging rate can cause an explosion.

So there you have it. Any additions or comments are more than welcome, and if there was something left out, it is certainly recommended that you add it here. ;)

:CAC

AmosF16
01-07-03, 05:08 AM
Great reminders. Sometimes common sense is the least common sense of all. Andy

JonM
01-07-03, 09:41 AM
I got to the third paragraph and :z...everyone is so sue happy these days its like reading the entire library of congress before you can use a product.

vette-dude
01-07-03, 09:51 AM
Ken,
Just want to emphasize that if your gas water heater is in the garage be sure you turn off the pilot light before disconnecting any fuel lines. Also same on a gas heater with an open pilot. Fiberglass won't burn but the resin will!!!:w

Randy

PS: I like your answer for the speed of dark.

CKA_Racing
01-17-03, 03:29 PM
They forgot to add, "Don't use cement cynder blocks as jack stands".

Trust me, they eventually crack and the car goes kabam on your body.;LOL

MsSchroder
01-17-03, 05:54 PM
Tie long hair behind your head.
I wish somebody had told me this BEFORE I changed my oil for the first time... got on a crawler and rolled right over my hair.... it hurt like bloody HELL... :L .... OK, I'm an idiot... but I did manage to get the oil changed. And I don't think I'll make that mistake again.

thanks for the tips, Ken.

Ken
01-17-03, 11:00 PM
Originally posted by MrsSchroder
... got on a crawler

Tammy, for your edification they are known as "creepers." Ain't I a stinker? :L

_ken :w

secondchance
01-17-03, 11:23 PM
Crawlers, creepers, ar'nt they all kind of creepy bugs???

warren s
01-17-03, 11:28 PM
Keep an approved fire extinguisher handy.

And make sure its charged and ready, not like the one you may have hanging on the wall since you bought you house.


Just want to emphasize that if your gas water heater is in the garage be sure you turn off the pilot light before disconnecting any fuel lines. Also same on a gas heater with an open pilot.

Great advice!! I do, and i will.

Thanks Ken and Vette-dude.

vettepilot
01-17-03, 11:29 PM
Originally posted by Ken
Tammy, for your edification they are known as "creepers." Ain't I a stinker? :L

_ken :w

But Ken, you just assumed she was using a "creeper".... don't forget down here in the Southeast we have "cockroaches" big enough to ride on, so it could have been something "crawley" she was using at the time. ;LOL

vettepilot

Patti
01-17-03, 11:57 PM
OUCH! That would make a unique Kodak moment, Mrs Schroder. :L Thanks for sharing. :)

:w
Patti



Originally posted by MrsSchroder
I wish somebody had told me this BEFORE I changed my oil for the first time... got on a crawler and rolled right over my hair.... it hurt like bloody HELL... :L .... OK, I'm an idiot... but I did manage to get the oil changed. And I don't think I'll make that mistake again.

thanks for the tips, Ken.

Ken
01-18-03, 12:09 AM
Originally posted by vettepilot
But Ken ;LOL

Don'tcha just love that smilie? ;LOL

hotrodd
01-18-03, 12:20 AM
Alway'sremove fender cover's,i.e blanket's when running engine.Cost me 80.00 dollar's for a A.C. clutch, which was probably cheap concidering what it could have tore up. That was one of those it will be O.K. deal's, carelessness will alway's win!

MsSchroder
01-18-03, 03:49 PM
Originally posted by Ken
Tammy, for your edification they are known as "creepers." Ain't I a stinker? :L

_ken :w

LOL!! Creepers... crawlers.... creepy crawlers (yeah, we got a creepy crawler maker for Christmas... brings back the memories, it does)... whatever!
I guess I pulled some brain cells out with the hair :L thanks for straightening me out :)

Bullitt
01-24-03, 02:44 AM
Don't use a city directory as a jackstand no matter how thick it is. Remember that story, Ken? :o

--Bullitt

Ken
01-24-03, 03:19 AM
:confused

Bullitt
01-24-03, 03:56 AM
My stupid jacking moment came when I first wanted to replace a fuel filter on a fuel injected car. The filter ran along the framerail, so I needed room. I was young and dumb, so I decided that I would use the scissor-type jack that the car came with. I also had no stands at the time, so I decided to use this huge Directory book as a stand. Well, the jack starts to fail, slowly twisting on itself and the car lands on the book. My Dad comes out about this time and has that "what in the Hell did you just do?" look on his face. I try to explain myself, but he just shook his head and assessed the situation.

"Move dummy," he said.
"But the jack won't go down," I say sheepishly.

My Dad turns it a few times up and moves the book out. Somehow the jack actually worked down and once again, my old man saves my a**. Then he turns to me and says, "If you want to work on a car, get the right damn tools." Needless to say I felt like two cents, but I did buy my first real tool set the next day, with the proper floor jack and stands. Farting under the car or when doing car work, is another issue.

Rest of thread... (http://www.corvetteactioncenter.com/forums/showthread.php?threadid=7531&perpage=15&highlight=phone%20book&pagenumber=2)

--Bullitt

Ken
01-24-03, 04:10 AM
:duh That means I just repeated myself in your other post! :hb

What's that about old age and senility? Alzen-who? :L

_ken :w

81kix
07-25-03, 05:36 AM
Originally posted by JonM
I got to the third paragraph and :z...everyone is so sue happy these days its like reading the entire library of congress before you can use a product.



Feel the same, thanks for waking me up.;stupid :grinshot

:grinshot

Ken
07-25-03, 02:21 PM
Well then, I guess y'all are missing the whole point - that of safety first! :nono

KOPBET
07-25-03, 05:23 PM
Originally posted by Ken
I recently purchased a book entitled How To Understand, Service and Modify CORVETTE Fuel Injection & Electronic Engine Management by Charles O. Probst. It covers the model years 1982 through 2001 and the L83, L98, LT1, LT4, LS1, LS6 and the LT5 (ZR-1) engines.


Call me what you will but I thought chapters 2 and 3 were fascinating! :crazy Recommended reading.

Florida Guy
01-21-04, 11:56 AM
Juat a couple of related stories.
1. A mechanic had a car on a lift, engine running and in gear to observe the drive train. His log hair got wrapped around the drive shaft and pulled his scalp off.
2. A home mechanic drove his Corvette onto a ramp, removed the u-joint and was killed when the car rolled back on him.
You're right - Safety first.

gooney0
01-31-04, 07:33 AM
Here is another one I didn't see in your list. Keep your hands away from moving parts!

I "touched" the fan once while leaning over to listen for a loose belt. Lucky for me nothing happend, but it scared the crap out of me as I almost lost a finger.

I guess that is why newer cars say "Caution Fan" :)

-Gööney0

bossvette
01-31-04, 09:31 AM
I put my wifes car on the lift when I went to let it down the switch stuck "on" and ran it into the trusses, if I had had the car 4" forward it would have cleared

http://img.villagephotos.com/p/2003-6/222440/DSC01133.JPG

Ken
01-31-04, 11:47 PM
Okay, here's a good one (At least he has some substantial cribbing supporting the car. ;))

I don't know about you, but I would be just a bit concerned if I was working under this car. Click the picture to see it full-size.


http://corvetteobsession.homestead.com/files/misc/DSCF0002_320.JPG (http://corvetteobsession.homestead.com/files/misc/DSCF0002_actual.JPG)

I can't even begin to imagine the trouble it was to lift the thing in place as it was. Amazing what people will go through to work on their cars; if you knew where I lived you'd understand why space is at such a premium. :eyerole

Paranoid
09-10-04, 09:14 PM
Don't forget about the 100 watt utility light. Be careful where it's placed as it's only a 100W but still gets hot. Especially when near a vinyl interior. :cry

Ken
09-10-04, 11:09 PM
That's one reason most of the shop lights nowadays use fluorescent bulbs - less heat, fewer burns. ;)

Man, I love that car of yours! Every time I see it. :upthumbs

vettepilot
11-22-04, 09:58 AM
Something I didn't see anybody mention. You know how we like to teach our children, and to do so means they need to be close by. Well, if you do have children that like to watch, or assist, make certain that you not just warn them of the dangers, but that you try to keep an eye on where they are. If that can't be done alone, maybe they shouldn't be in the immediate area, or ask your wife, girlfriend, significant other to come help watch. Keep in mind their age and attention span, young children have a very short attention span, and will become lost in their own world while you're busy working on the car. That means they will soon forget all that you told them about such as, don't play inside the car while I'm under it, don't turn the steering wheel unless I tell you to, etc.

So with that in mind, keeping them busy handing you safe tools such as wrenches or hammers will keep them interested. Screwdrivers and hack saws are not the best things because of the danger of stabbing and or cutting injuries.
I'm sure many of you can think of other things that young children can find around the shop with which to produce self-inflicted injuries.

vettepilot

Ken
11-22-04, 06:42 PM
Thanks for adding that tip! :upthumbs

All too often we get caught up in the job we're concentrating on, and if there are children in the shop they tend to get neglected. The next thing you know they're into something they shouldn't be into, and there's nothing worse than suddenly hearing a terrified scream coming from a child. :eek

Let's be safe out there! :CAC

MaineShark
11-22-04, 08:58 PM
Screwdrivers and hack saws are not the best things because of the danger of stabbing and or cutting injuries.

Why are you using a hacksaw under your car?! :L

Joe

vettepilot
11-23-04, 02:15 AM
Why are you using a hacksaw under your car?! :L

Joe
Trying to cut my expenses? :L


vettepilot