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Ken
06-13-02, 04:34 AM
I have to share this with everyone, and not everyone will want to look into a thread called "Wanna Trade?", so I stuck it here: Trailering Your Corvette (http://www.geocities.com/MotorCity/Downs/3000/trailer3.html). That way it has a post of its own. ;)

Bullitt
06-13-02, 07:01 AM
I saw this the other day, but I forgot about your trailer quest, Ken. Anyways, this reminds me of the time my father witnessed someone towing their pristine '55 Mercury. My father said it was one of the nicest cars he's ever seen, but unfortunately, the driver of the pick-up was too eager to make a right turn. He didn't slow down enough and screwed everything up. My dad said the sight of seeing the whole combo tossed on it's side was rather heartbreaking as the weight shifted too far. What was worse he said, was seeing the beautiful 'ol Merc roll over two times after it broke from the tie-downs. The driver was unhurt physically, but he was crying like a man who had to shoot his own dog. Sometimes physics and stupidity really suck! :(

--Bullitt

69MyWay
06-13-02, 09:47 AM
Great article. Much of what he wrote is what I went through in the decision process.

It makes me feel really good about my purchase decision based upon my towing needs.


Thanks for sharing Ken.

Piet
06-13-02, 10:16 AM
Great article! Well thought out and goes into good detail about the trailer...

Just finished refurbishing my Dad's 5,000 lb rated 'ulility' trailer. He is a train nut and owns a speeder so all this info applies...

Thanks Ken.

69MyWay
06-13-02, 10:29 AM
One thing I would add, is that article is dated somewhat by recent technology. As far as the Diesel engines go, with the intro of the new HD Duramax series of G.M. trucks, I would rank them as Chevy, Ford, then Dodge in terms of power, reliability, etc.

Also, since this article has been written, G.M. introduced a new series of auto transmissions based upon the 700R4 platform. My 95 Dually has the larger heavier duty overdrive version. It is a very strong and dependable unit.

Ken
07-10-02, 01:30 AM
Here is the rig, hooked-up and the Vette's inside. (click it)
http://corvetteobsession.homestead.com/files/MYothervehicles/truckandtrailersmall.JPG (http://corvetteobsession.homestead.com/files/MYothervehicles/truckandtrailer.JPG)

Now maybe if somebody with experience securing a C4 for transport would speak up, I'd appreciate any tips before I hit the road in August.

I am currently using the area around the lower shock mounts at the rear, and on the bracing to the frame horns at the front, to secure the vehicle. Is there a better way? There isn't much under there to hook onto. ;)

Also, I can't think of a weigh-station anywhere nearby, although there are probably many, how do I determine when I have approximately fifteen percent of the load on the tongue? My bathroom scale doesn't go that high! :L

_ken :w

69MyWay
07-10-02, 05:44 AM
You look like a real pro now. Nice rig.

Nope, I don't have any better suggestions for you. When I tie down my 90 I used the rear frame horns just between the bumper and spare tire area, and I use the front X member hooks. The bottom center deck is open, so I have a little more room to kind a climb under and hook it.

Ken
07-10-02, 11:32 AM
Originally posted by 69MyWay
You look like a real pro now.

I've been telling people that I may not be a professional, but I'll go out looking like one. ;)


... I use the front X member hooks.

If you mean the hooks used from the factory, there is no such animal on mine; they must have disappeared before I got it. :eyerole

_ken :w

Ken
07-11-02, 12:22 PM
Nobody else has any tips for loading a C4 onto a trailer and securing it?

_ken :booty

fastglass95
07-16-02, 10:06 PM
Just my opinion, but, I prefer the open trailers so everybody else on the highway can see what I'm pullin' ! Get lots of looks from 8 year olds to 80 year olds :upthumbs and sometimes :crazy and sometimes :j just depends.

Ken, I use the factory tie downs located on C4's in all four corners of the frame. I can't belive that they have been removed! Basically look behind each wheel for a "slot" hanging down from, but attached to the frame. It's what the transport people used to transport new Vette's from the factory to the dealers.

That is a good article.
Thanks,

Maybe now I can convince my wife that I need a new "Dura-Max" diesel engine in a new 1-ton crew cab pick-up! :SLAP

Ken
07-17-02, 12:23 AM
Thanks Tom, I found 'em. ;)

Good luck on your new truck purchase, if you can talk her into it that is. :L

_ken :w

Ken
07-20-02, 07:33 PM
I guess I should point out here that a guy on the NCCCNet told a story of how his factory tie-downs started breaking at the spot welds, after a few years of using them as places to secure his Vette. He started using the T-hooks from AW Direct (http://www.awdirect.com/awdirect/catalog.cfm?dest=Index), a supplier to the service industry, such as towing companies and road crews. Cool site! :cool

Now, if I could only find holes big enough to accept the "Ts"... Corvettes just HAVE to be different! :L

_ken :w

fastglass95
07-21-02, 11:20 AM
Hey Ken,

Dave, at R & D Racing (yea! that's THE guy :eyerole ) uses the "T-hooks" you are talking about. I'm not sure what he attaches them to on the car? Of course he has one of them "cease-fire" vettes, so who knows?

98% of the vettes I see being trailered, use the factory welded on hooks. Maybe the guy over on that "other forum", overtightens the straps! Just a thought, you want them tight, but not so tight that the straps are like banjo strings!

Maybe Dave will chime in here!

Me-> :SLAP <- Dave :L

Ken
07-21-02, 02:09 PM
Originally posted by fastglass95
Dave, at R & D Racing (yea! that's THE guy :eyerole )
Me-> :SLAP <- Dave :L

Thanks Tom, I couldn't remember who gave me that "heads-up" on the factory mounts, but at least Dave wasn't the one who told me to use the half-shafts! :eyerole

:L I haven't seen you two go at it in a while; I was beginning to wonder what's been going on there, Dave's been visiting here very little lately. :confused

_ken :w

Ken
07-21-02, 11:31 PM
By the way y'all, I found some more trailering tips at Sherline Products (http://www.sherline.com/lmbook.htm#refrn23), along with some Trailering Horror Stories (http://www.sherline.com/disaster.htm). :eek

_ken :w

fastglass95
07-22-02, 09:16 PM
Ken, One more tip, get a "Load Distributing Hitch" if you can! They do work great! You can really transfer a lot of the tounge weight to the front axle of the tow vehicle. It still does not make any sense to me about how it works, but it works!

No, I do not have one.

But, I've pulled the previously mentioned "DAVE", of R & D Racing's trailer with my tow vehicle (his trailer has the weigt distributing hitch system) and the differnce is very noticeable.

Ken
07-22-02, 09:26 PM
Yeah Tom, I installed a weight distributing hitch as well as an anti-sway device. I know it's a little bit of overkill, but it's better to be safe than sorry, eh? Thing is, with the Featherlite trailer being so light, when the car is not on the trailer there is no weight on the tongue to speak of, so I have to remove the distributing hitch when it's empty. :L

_ken :w

Tom Bryant
07-23-02, 03:19 AM
Ken,

I don't think that the anti-sway is overkill at all. I know people that find them necessary on multi sled snowmobile trailers. Much lighter than a car and enclosed trailer. Of course those guys usually try to get from Indiana to northern Michigan in 1/2 hour to 45 minutes. :eyerole

Have you considered the tie downs that go over the tires? They look like the hot setup to me. Wheels can't move, the car still rides on it's suspension and you aren't hooked to anything that can bend or crack with repeated use.

Tom

maxrevs85
07-23-02, 05:50 AM
Ken ,the sway bar is no overkill!! Its worth every penny.

Ken
07-23-02, 01:18 PM
Tom, Dave, I refer to the anti-sway device as being "overkill" in the sense that seeing as I have the weight-distributing hitch, the anti-sway device isn't necessary. At least from what I've been told. ;)

_ken :w

maxrevs85
07-23-02, 04:21 PM
Ken , The hitch is for wieght distribution and to help with tongue wieght . With this setup you can tow more becuase you sre distributing the wieght on the whole tow vehicle not just the rear axle. While it does help stablize , it will do nothing for sway. Believe me Ken I have towed car haulers for years. The sway bar is in absolute dream to have . Passing semi's and motorhomes are a trip , then throw in a little wind at the side . It is the difference between being comfortable towing or nerve racking. I drove thru the mountains with and without . I wont go without.
Well there is my .50. :)

Ken
07-23-02, 09:13 PM
:cool I see (said the blind man...) :L

_ken :w

DkBG
07-23-02, 09:27 PM
Just a simple , friction type , will help a bunch . I remember pulling my little camper without one when I first bought it . The trailer started whipping my half ton shortbed all over the highway . I've never pulled it since without a swaybar . Cliff

fastglass95
07-23-02, 09:45 PM
You guys are just taking ALL the FUN out of trailering :(

Ken
07-23-02, 09:52 PM
:L

maxrevs85
07-24-02, 05:30 AM
Thats " Dumb and Blind" (per Lou anyway) :L:L

I have the friction type , works very well. :cool

Ken
07-24-02, 01:56 PM
Man, it gets under your skin after a while, or it's always on your mind I guess, but last night I actually dreamt that I was running without the anti-sway device and I rolled the trailer. Am I sick or what? :L

_ken :w

maxrevs85
07-24-02, 03:34 PM
Yes and yes :L:L:L

Rowdy1
07-24-02, 03:44 PM
Don't go to sleep anymore:z

Ken
07-24-02, 04:53 PM
Originally posted by Rowdy1
Don't go to sleep anymore:z

Sometimes sleep is hard to come by; last night was one of those. ;)

_ken :w

andrewcanada
03-01-03, 09:45 PM
AW Direct (http://www.awdirect.com/awdirect/catalog.cfm?dest=Index), a supplier to the service industry, such as towing
_ken :w [/B][/QUOTE] Thanks for the hotlink. I luv:J getting catalogs!

fastglass95
03-01-03, 10:01 PM
OK, Since we brought this topic back up!

I do know that wieght distributing hitch systems do work. I do not use one since I enjoy the trailering challenge without one. Yes, I have pulled trailers with them, and do like them.

My question for any "Physics" majors, or "Mechanical Engineers" out there, is:

How in the heck do they work???? [In theory] I mean, I know how to hook them up, adjust the tension with the chain links, ect..., But, it just doesn't seem to make sense to me how you can transfer wieght to the front axle of the tow viechle by tensioning rods on the trailer tongue?

Anybody?

;shrug

*89x2*
03-01-03, 10:04 PM
I am thinking that the bars, which are chained to the A Iron of the trailer are then tied into the tow vehicles frame through the mount (which is the large hitch itself).
This ties the trailer chassis into the vehicle chassis versus simply sitting on the tounge and ball.

Rowdy1
03-01-03, 10:23 PM
Must be me, I can't find any. Got tons of receivers though.:confused

Ken
03-01-03, 10:35 PM
Originally posted by andrewcanada
Thanks for the hotlink. I luv:J getting catalogs!

Ain't AW a cool catalog! :cool

Tom, I started thinking about it and my head exploded! :L Sorry, I can't manage an intelligible answer. :eyerole

The best I can offer is from Drawtite's (http://www.hitches-forless.com/WD/about_wd_hitches.htm) site:

Operation of a Weight-Distributing Hitch
The Draw-Tite differences are in construction materials, welding, manufacturing processes and hook-up. Adjustment is simple because of the easy-to-operate snap-up brackets that allow spring bar tension to be adjusted by changing links in the support chains. This lets you adjust for various trailer tongue weights within the spring bar weight range by applying tension on the spring bars until the car or tow vehicle is level. Rather than merely supporting the trailer tongue weight (TW), weight distributing hitches apply leverage between the towing vehicle and trailer causing the TW to be carried by all axles of the tow vehicle and trailer. When TW is distributed in this way, trailers with greater TWs can be towed resulting in a more level ride which reduces stress on the rear of the tow vehicle and provides greater steering and brake control.

Clear as mud, eh? ;)

_ken :w

*89x2*
03-01-03, 10:37 PM
Originally posted by Ken
Clear as mud, eh? ;)

_ken :w

Exactly :)

andrewcanada
03-01-03, 11:22 PM
Not just mud, but `da good mud!

Interceptor430
03-02-03, 10:20 AM
I've not trailered my Vette yet...but have trailered many many other cars and classics. What works great for me (and I would expect to do the same with my Vette), is to use axel straps...
straps that are about 18 inches long - one at each corner, and then secure the straps to the trailer with PowerPulls/Comealongs.

Tom Bryant
03-02-03, 12:21 PM
Originally posted by Ken
Ain't AW a cool catalog! :cool

Tom, I started thinking about it and my head exploded! :L Sorry, I can't manage an intelligible answer. :eyerole

The best I can offer is from Drawtite's (http://www.hitches-forless.com/WD/about_wd_hitches.htm) site:


Clear as mud, eh? ;)

_ken :w


Makes sense to me. Maybe I'm just wierd.

Tom

Ken
03-02-03, 02:53 PM
Originally posted by Interceptor430
... one at each corner, and then secure the straps to the trailer with PowerPulls/Comealongs.

Don't forget -- cross the straps to prevent side-to-side movement. It will move at some time or another, believe me. ;)

I also utilize an anti-sway device; trailers straight as an arrow! :upthumbs

_ken :w